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My Military Spouse Creed

Creed:  (n) a set or formal statements of beliefs

Most of what I am about to write is in reply to one comment relating to my post last weekend.  I am the military spouse that does indeed fuss to her husband, but only when necessary. He expects this from me…not in the “she hasn’t complained, so what is wrong with her” kind of way, but in the “I married her because I know where she stands” kind of way.

This is my military spouse creed:

I believe in the United States, its military, and the job my husband has committed a huge chunk of his life to supporting.  I believe that by marrying my husband, I have committed myself to supporting the United States Military and all the men and women who work within.

I believe we are a team; my husband understands that military life is not just difficult on his end but on my end, too.  I believe that while I may want to complain, there is a time and place for everything and sometimes I need to hold my tongue.  Other times I am free to speak my mind about what I am feeling and not to worry about him having an important job to do because dammit, I have an important job to do as well and that is to support his ass.  I do this freely and with love.

I believe that while “military spouse” might be part of my definition, it does not define me.  I have layers, like onions and ogres.  All can be disagreeable at times, but all are needed.  I believe that anything I do with a spouse group or base organization is solely for my benefit and not his.  Baking cupcakes for the squadron will not get him promoted.  There is pretty much nothing I can do externally to aid his career, but there are quite a few things I can do that may cause it to derail.   

I believe that when my husband is deployed, I should keep my trap shut about things that aren’t important, and let him have his say about how things should be handled at home so he feels a part of the team.  I also believe that when my husband is deployed, I should run things my own damn way, but agree with him because it makes him feel better and does no harm.

I believe that while we are civilians, spouses should get into Disney free as well.  And any other theme park.  Since we plan the trip and make it happen.  And often alone.  

I believe that actions and words produce respect, not just rank.  This also applies to spouses.  If your spouse is ranked higher than ours, we are not your secretary or personal assistant.  

I believe in the truth being told and not sugar coating how topsy-turvy it is to be a military spouse or the emotions felt during a PCS, but I also believe we get over it and move on.   I understand at times this requires me to put on my big girl panties and deal.  

I believe in other military spouses and the strength that they hold within, whether they know it or not.  I believe in asking for advice when and where I can to help not only me, but others along this journey.  I believe in my military family, and how they carry me through my most difficult moments.

I believe being married to an active duty military member not only has made me stronger, but has brought out strengths I did not know I possessed.  I believe in having my own toolkit which no one is allowed to touch but me so that I may always find the hammer, drill, and wrench in times of need.

I believe in this crazy, turbulent, and emotional military life.  I believe in myself, in trusting my instincts, and in knowing when to speak out about how much my life sucks at time, but also in telling others about my absolutely wonderful, magical, and nomadic life.

What do you believe should be included in this creed?

About Heidi

Married to her high school sweetheart/AD Air Force man, Heidi was initially reluctant to life as a dependent, finally drank the Kool-Aid, and has since embraced being an active Air Force spouse. With a background in sports medicine, she has no real reason to write other than she enjoys it and likes to get others thinking. Heidi enjoys at-will employment as a substitute teacher, serving as an Arlington Lady, mothering two boys, rehabbing their short sale home purchase, recovering from a case of volunteeritis, correcting her verb tense, and learning more acronyms.