Big Cuts, Changes Coming to GI Bill Transfers

Want to transfer your GI Bill? Better not wait.

Edit February 10: The House has voted on this legislation. You want to read this important update.

If you’re eligible to transfer your GI Bill, do it now. Don’t stop to ask “why?” Do it even if you don’t think your spouses or kids will end up using it. Do it even if you think you might want to get out and use it yourself.

Do. It. Now.

Did you do it? OK, now I’ll tell you why.

The House and Senate are both working on legislation that will increase the time you are required to serve from six to 10 before making the transfer,  while also eliminating the ability for children who have been transferred a parent’s GI Bill to receive the entire Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) payout. Instead they will only receive half the amount.

That’s a 50 percent cut for the children of service members to the cash that is supposed to help cover the cost of living for post-9/11 GI Bill users.

(Many thanks to our friends at MOAA for giving us the heads-up about this upcoming change).

If you transfer your GI Bill now and change your mind later about giving it away, you can always easily take it back. Transferring is not a permanent decision. Want to keep the benefit as it is and make sure someone other than you can use it? Transfer it now. Those who have transferred the benefit before 180 days after the new legislation is signed into law will get to use it as it currently stands.

Those who don’t? Out of luck.

Right now almost everyone using the post-9/11 GI Bill receives an E-5 housing allowance based on the location of their school (or, if the school is online, based on the national average amount). Only spouses of currently serving troops using a transferred bill do not receive the BAH payout. And to transfer the benefit you must serve six years and agree to serve four more.

But a panel last year recommended that the housing allowance be totally eliminated for children of troops using the transferred bill. They found that the BAH payment was often much higher than the actual cost of room and board at a school. For example, New School University in New York charged $18,490 for room and board for the nine-month school year between 2013-2014. But the BAH payment for that area over that period was $31,752, the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Committee (MCRMC) said in their report.

Rather than agree to getting rid of the entire payment for the children of service members as the MCRMC proposed, Congress is planning to cut it in half, seemingly to bring the payment more in line with actual room and board costs.

And while they are at it, they are planning to follow another MCRMC recommendation and increase the amount of time you must serve before you can transfer from six years with an additional four year service obligation to 10 years, with an additional two year obligation. That means you will be required to serve longer before you can transfer your post-9/11 GI Bill to your child or spouse.

Sounds fun, huh?

Officials with MOAA said they are choosing to focus their fight on the increase in service obligation. That’s because, they said, the whole point of giving people the option to transfer their GI Bill is to increase military retention. And if you dictate how and when it can be transferred, you take transfer choices and the ability to use them as a retention tool away from the Defense Department. Instead, they said, the DoD should change the transfer rules as needed.

The long and the short of it is this: if you can, transfer your GI Bill today – or you’re going to risk totally missing out.

Edit: Want to see the legislation? Go here.

About the Author

Amy Bushatz
Amy is the editor in chief of Military.com’s spouse and family blog SpouseBuzz.com. A journalist by trade, Amy also covers spouse and family news for Military.com where she is the managing editor of spouse and family content. An Army wife and mother of two, Amy has been featured as a subject matter expert on CNN.com, NPR, Fox News, NBC, CBS, ABC and BBC as well as in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post. Follow her on twitter @amybushatz.
  • Drew

    What specific legislation contains this change? Ive been trying to find details about this but the only places that are reporting this change are you and the MOAA.

    • Amy_Bushatz

      Hi Drew! Great question. Here’s the Thomas link. Do a search in it for “transfer” — whew is it ever buried. https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/hous

      • Katheryn

        Thank you, I have been looking all over for the exact piece of legislation. Had a several Wounded guys from previous units and WTB’s looking for it.

      • Stephen

        The legislation doesn’t pop when I click the link. Do you think they took it down?

        • Amy_Bushatz

          Hmmm Stephen — still working for me. Try copying/pasting it? I know it’s kind of an epic-long URL.

  • Michelle

    Does the amount transferred to dependents matter? Is it ok to transfer a small amount not and then increase it later if there’s some remaining?

    • Amy_Bushatz

      Hi! Another great question. Nope! I would recommend transferring the whole thing since you can so easily undo it.

      • Gary Gerhart

        If you transfer 100% and then retire or separate, you cannot change it or take any back for yourself.

        • USAF Ed Specialist

          That’s not true. The service member always has the right to take back their benefit whether they are active duty or separated.

        • Amy_Bushatz

          Nope — you can still take it back. Now, is it easy to take back? Depends how long you have on hand to sit on hold.

    • M&M

      We wer told several years ago that it had to be at least $100. You could then transfer more if need be.

      • USAF Ed Specialist

        You don’t transfer amounts, you transfer months. I would do further research as you were given inaccurate information. It is recommended that you transfer the maximum number of months (36 total) at the time of transfer (it can always be changed later as necessary–or taken back for use by the service memeber). However if the service member were to die, the distribution of months can no longer be changed (not even by the beneficiary). It’s best to distribute the months in your ideal scenario….just in case something were to happen.

  • M&M

    The problem with this is not that they’re changing the BAH, it’s that people were getting too much. No one else gets BAH for college; this is a change I can live with. The changing the number of years of serving before being allowed to make the change is a bit much though.

    • Samantha

      Right? I just enrolled myself in the only LVN to BSN in my area. Husband has 4 1/2 years in and was hoping to transfer benefits to me midway throughout my schooling. If they change it to 10 years… $100,000 in school debt here I come…

  • boston bean

    I have a son that retired from the Navy with 20 +years of service. He has no wife or children but he does have nieces and nephews that really could use monetary assistance. Is it possible to transfer these benefits to one or share it with them?

    • Kyle

      The transfer of benefits is only available to dependents of the military member that are in DEERS. Nephews and nieces don’t meet this criteria.

    • Hopeithelps

      If they are under 18, and he legally adopts them and puts them in DEERS, he could. That would be the only way that I know of.

      • Peggy

        Nope, he already retired. He would have had to do that several years ago.

  • Lee

    I retired several years ago but never used my Montgomery GI bill. I transferred to the newer post – 9/11 before my 10 year deadline, and received a 5 year extension on the new bill. Is the government ever going to let retirees transfer there rights to there kids? Both my kids (young adults) are in college and they could definitely use the monetary assistance.

    • Army wife

      We are in the same boat. My hubby retired Nov. 2008, and they FINALLY approved the transferability in Aug. 2009. (after years of talking about it) We had one daughter headed to college at that time, and one currently in college, but he was not able to transfer any of his G.I.Bill to them. Chances are he won’t use it either, as he is in his early 60’s now and still has a full-time job. We would have really like to have the benefits he served 25 years for and cannot use.

  • Dan

    The big problem here are service member that are abusing their benefits. I know a retired service member whose child is using his Gi Bill benefits. She is living at home and collecting the E-5 BAH pay as an extra bonus each month to pad their pockets. I think that many stories like these of those service members who fell “entitled” vice using the benefits for what they were designed to be used for is costing the VA too much money that is causing these reforms.

    • Max

      What is the difference to you whether the person gets the BAH and chooses to live at home or pay for an additional apartment? The cost to the government is no different. What if the person lives outside the area, voluntarily, to cut the cost so she can stretch those dollars to also cover food or utilities. Are you okay with that? Isn’t that what many, many military members do with their BAH? What if the family uses it to replace the contributions the student no longer makes? She’s a student so she can’t contribute to the family’s resources.
      It IS an entitlement. It offsets the living expenses of that person while they go to college. If that’s not what it was designed for, what is?

  • Dedee

    Can a spouse or a veteran receive pay, even if the veteran is still alive

  • Amy

    My husband is set to retire 1 November this year with 25+ years. He is eligible for post 9/11 GI bill, but would not use it himself. I have told him so many times over the past 10 years to transfer the bill to our daughters, but to date he has not. Now we have one that will graduate at the end of May and one that is graduating next year. Are we completely out of luck now? I have a feeling we are. If service makes a difference in policies, he’s in the Marine Corps.

    • CDG

      He has already served his 6 years of required service, however, once you transfer, you have to serve an additional 4 years. These are the current policies in place. Regardless of the new policy, if he is retiring this year, he has waited too long.

      • Trax

        Not sure this is true. If the service commitment isn’t enacted yet, it sounds unenforceable. However, at least 1 month should go to dependents, because once retired, you can only change the allocation, not add people to the list of transfers.

        • B1C

          No. CDG is right. You must serve 4 years from the date your election to transfer benefits is approved.it is too late unless he can serve 4 more years. That is the current law.

  • S

    So, if my husband has already transferred his benefit to our son, and we have made financial decisions based on e-5 bah rate being paid, are we going to be grandfathered in or are we just out of luck? It’s really hard to make financial plans based on what we were told the benefits were, when the benefit keeps changing.

    • Amy_Bushatz

      S — It SEEMS like you’ll be grandfathered, but who knows until the final rule is released?

  • Elizabeth

    If the GI Bill is transferred to the spouse can it be moved from the spouse to the children if the spouse does not use it?

    • Jennifer

      Yes.

    • USAF Ed Specialist

      As long as the member has allocated at least one month to each dependent registered under them in DEERs (which must be done while the member is on active duty), then yes–the allocation of months for each dependent can be moved to meet the family needs. If the children were not allocated months while the member was still on active duty, then the answer is no. They cannot be added once the member leaves active duty. It’s the same as if the member had a child after leaving active duty. That child would not have been registered in DEERs and therefore would not be eligible for the transfer benefit.

  • Heidi

    What many are failing to recognize is that the GI Bill covers tuition- the BAH covers the room & board. I think the school in NY is the extreme end of an example. Our daughter is at the University of Alabama and the BAH rate covers the cheapest dorm (traditional, communal bathroom in the hall, 2 to a room). They only have 1 of these dorms, so not everyone gets to live in it. Instead, she lives in a suite, so we pay $1,600 out of pocket per semester. I’m NOT complaining, just stating that not ALL BAH is excessive. And I would argue that in MOST cases BAH just covers it’s intended purpose…room & board for the college student. Additionally, BAH isn’t paid when school isn’t in session. For example, Alabama dorms open Jan 9th, so her BAH payment will be Jan 9-31. Dorms close May 10th, BAH will be for 10 days. Add this up for fall & spring, and you get 8 months…not 12 months of BAH. After freshmen year, all upper classmen have to live off campus. Rentals are all for 12 months. That means we’ll pay for 12 months of housing, with 8 months of BAH…again paying out of pocket. And that doesn’t include the “board” part (aka “food”). We are SUPER lucky to have been able to transfer the GI Bill. Our daughter is getting a $40k x 4 years education (out of state rate) for $3-5k per year. Again, I’m NOT complaining just giving a “real” example of how the BAH works.

    • smandysen

      Exactly! The example given is not what most people actually experience. Our daughter is headed to school in the fall. We are blessed that it is a yellow ribbon school and that her BAH will basically break even in meeting her room and board expenses.

    • Cynthia

      Heidi, ask your school for in state tuition if you are retired/vet. If you submit your dd214 they should be able to give your child in state tuition. New bill POTUS signed effective 1jan.

      • Dana Welch

        Cynthia, what law was that? I would like to look it up.

  • Jennifer

    I want to confirm what Heidi has stated above. The New York example they give is a rare case. My daughter is attending East Tennesee State and the BAH does not fully cover her room and board. She lives in a traditional double occupancy dorm room and eats in the campus cafeteria and we still have to come up with $1300 per semester out of pocket.

    • BAHdoesntcoverit

      I’m in Middle GA and I can attest to BAH not even covering the cost of the dorms in state. The only way to make it work with BAH is to get a small place off-campus and get a roommate or two or even 3. Forget it if you yourself have kids and want to go to school after you get out. Expect to work 30+ hours a week and take 12 credit hours of classes every semester.

  • bonnie

    My husband signed up me and both of our kids before he retired. Our son went to go and use it, and it was declined. My husband called to check on it, and they said he never signed us up. They told us it was to late, and he is the only who can use it. He has 4 degrees and doesn’t need it.

    • Misty black

      I’m in the same boat as you and apparently there are a lot of us. I am in the appeals process but 45,000 dollars later and still nothing. It has to do with the old system bumping us out. I am about done and heading to the media.

      • Sarah

        We were also misinformed. I had even called the VA a couple of years before my husband got out. They explained it as he can put in the transfer once he had 10 years in service. Well once he hit 10 years, the career planner even said yes your good I am putting it in for you to transfer. Well one day I decided to look online, which wasn’t easy to figure out where to go and I happen to notice that his request was declined. After calling, found out he was supposed to do this transfer at 6 years in and obligate to 4 more years. No one ever explained it that way and all the information I could find several years ago didn’t explain it well. Found out it was more of a retention incentive. I was so disappointed especially after being misinformed! Nothing we could do. :((

      • guest

        Oh yes, run to the media and make the community look like a bunch of entitled whiners…THAT’s gonna help when it comes time to look at GI Bill cuts.

    • Lisa

      This happened to me too a few years before i retired from the Air Force. I signed up on the website (when this was still somewhat new) allocating 48% to each of my children and leaving 2% to me knowing i could move the percentages around. I clicked save, viewed it played around a little more went back in viewed it and left. A year later mil connect came out and became mandatory to sign in. When i signed in i went to ed benefits and it showed nothing as far as my gi bill allocations. I called AFPC about it and they told me that there were 4 systems not talking to eachother when i signed up. They asked if i recieved a letter in the mail and i said no, they said well if you didnt sign the letter and return it then it is not official. Like I was supposed to know this!!! So at that point i didnt reenroll because i didnt want the added year service commitment. So because of a faulty system i am now paying out of pocket for my son to attend a university, my retirement paycheck is going toward a benefit that was denied to me when i did what i was supposed to do. I am sure if they audited the tables in these databases they could see who signed up and i guarantee you my name is on there. Were do i sign up with these other veterans that were done wrong and robbed of these benefits for there children. I served honorably for 20 years and did what i was instructed to do to transfer. This is BS!!!

      • Deb

        My husband retired October 1st of 2009 after 26 years of service. This was the same year the transfer eligibility came into effect. During his outprocessing he was told he still had time to register, knowing he was going to be on terminal leave. He tried but found out he no longer had access to the military website and therefore was ineligible. This was a new program and the outprocessor did not know what she was talking about. Now are sons are attending college and we pay for everything! I also would like to know where I can sign up with other veterans who were wronged! It still frustrates me but writing to our congressman is a waste of time

        • guest

          If he retired in 09 the kids wouldn’t be eligible anyway since he would have to do 4 more years in the service. Since this didn’t come about until 09, how were you planning on paying for the kids schooling…obviously you had a plan to pay for it since this program didn’t exist prior to his retirement

  • Anne

    Don’t assume that the changes are negative for everyone. My husband has 9.5 years in, but would like to keep the option of getting out of the service. Right now he would have to sign up for four more years to transfer benefits to our children, but with the changes he will be able to sign up for just two. Losing half the BAH for two years off the commitment is worth it to us.

  • Nena

    If the person in the White House has never put a uniform. what makes you think He will fight for the military , he never had to be without he’s spouse, never had to make ends meet, of course take away the thing that will make sure your children will get an education they deserve, no education what a better way to control peoples mind !!! let me know where I need to sign a petition for your support in this battle!!!

  • Lia

    What if I have the Montgomery GI Bill? Can I still transfer it to my child!

    • USAF Ed Specialist

      No, you would need to convert your Montgomery GI Bill to the Post 9/11. The Post 9/11 is the only one that allows for transfer of benefits. I would recommend speaking with your Education Office as your question is not a simple one and many factors come into play based on your own personal situation and service component.

  • Lia

    What if I have the Montgomery GI Bill? Can I still transfer it to my child?

    • Cinnamon45

      You can only transfer the Post 9/11 bill to dependents.

  • Ann Lee

    Is this benefit available to Army Reservists?

    • Jim Absher

      Probably not, you have to be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill and have at least 6 years active duty then re-up for 4 more. So, unless you are in a special program like Active Guard Reserve, your chances would be slim.

      • Dave

        Actually, reservists can transfer benefits if they have the service length to qualify for Post-9/11 GI Bill and meet the service requirements for transferring. The law does not specify that the service length for TRANSFER is all active duty. The service or basic eligibility does have to be active.

  • Stephanie

    How do we transfer? Where can I find the information on how to transfer?

  • Paul

    Hi. Do you think the cut in BAH will affect everyone including those of us who transferred the benefit when it first was introduced? Or, will it be new to those who transfer it after it is signed into law?

    • Jim Absher

      It looks like it will affect everyone.

      • Dave

        No, it says it only applies to transfers initiated 180 days after the law is signed. If you complete the benefit transfer prior to that day, you and your dependents will not be impacted.

  • Sandi Peterson

    My son was AD for 8 yrs, now a reservist for the lat 5 yrs (13 total). Can he tsf to his son, if he agrees to 4 more yrs in reserves?

    • Jim Absher

      The law says he needs to re-up for active duty. The military uses transferability as a retention tool to keep people in the service.

      • Dave

        I don’t think it specifies active duty anywhere. Reservists can transfer if they have eligibility.

        • HarleyChic

          The option to transfer is open to any member of the armed forces active duty or Selected Reserve, officer or enlisted who is eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and meets the following criteria:
          Has at least six years of service in the armed forces (active duty and/or Selected Reserve) on the date of approval and agrees to serve four additional years in the armed forces from the date of election.
          Has at least 10 years of service in the armed forces (active duty and/or Selected Reserve) on the date of approval, is precluded by either standard policy (by Service Branch or DoD) or statute from committing to four additional years, and agrees to serve for the maximum amount of time allowed by such policy or statute.
          Is or becomes retirement-eligible and agrees to serve an additional four years of service on or after Aug. 1, 2012. A Servicemember is considered to be retirement-eligible if he or she has completed 20 years of active federal service or 20 qualifying years as computed (pursuant to section 12732 of title 10 U.S.C.).
          Transfer requests are submitted and approved while the member is in the armed forces.

      • Michele

        That is not true!!

  • Army guy

    I hope everyone realizes this bill hasn’t even been looked at yet. It was introduced back in July and has been pushed off even further. On top of that you then have 180 days after enactment to get everything sorted.

    Thanks for causing a spouse facebook drama storm though.

    • Amy_Bushatz

      Not true — like our friends at MOAA reported, the Senate took action to match it in their version in early December. http://www.moaa.org/Content/Take-Action/Top-Issue

      • Army guy

        Yet it still had not been seen our voted on by the house.

      • Army guy

        The very link you provide to the legislation clearly shows that this bill has not moved passed the introduction stage and has been moved to a further calendar. Essentially it has been kicked down the road.

        To tell me my comment was not true based on a single misunderstood line from another article website that is apparently the only source you read is very misleading to everyone reading here.

        To further clarify, “the Senate took action…” is simply language meant to convey action when in reality all the senate did is develop a similar/identical bill that includes the same provisions. They may vote on their version first and wait for the House to catch up, or it may go the traditional route.

        Likely it will suffer the same fate of most bills, especially in an election year and never be considered.

        Please do a minimum of research before telling an entire population of people that a core benefit of their service is changing. It is telling that only this site and the MOAA site “reported” this at all, because there is nothing to report.

        Moving your post 9/11 benefits to your children sooner rather than later is sound advice however.

  • Andrew

    Hello, thanks for the article! I am wondering, my wife and I are both active duty. She has already transferred her entire GI bill to our son. We are hoping to have a second child to which I would transfer mine. Since this is an upcoming change is there any benefit for me to transfer the GI Bill to my Wife… then can it be changed to our second child avoiding the new laws since it has already been transferred. Would this re-transfer be subject to the new laws? Just wondering if there is anything I can do. Thanks!

    • Jim Absher

      Hard to say, it looks like the law will be effective when passed, which means that the BAH will drop for all transferees, not just the ones who get transferred benefits after the law. So it won’t make any difference.

      But, remember the law also changes the transferability eligibility window. Currently you have to have 6 years active duty and reenlist for 4 to be eligible to transfer, if the law is passed you will have to be active for 8 and reenlist for 2 more. So that may make a difference in your decision.

      We always advise people to transfer as soon as they can and give each eligible dependent (spouse or child) at least one month of benefits. You can always reallocate the transferred benefits at a later date, but if you don’t designate a dependent as a recipient while you are on active duty they can’t be added on later.

      • HarleyChic

        Remember though, in order for a child to use it, they have to have at least one month transferred in their name when transferred. That child must ALREADY be enrolled in DEERS at the time of the transfer. So transferring to your wife before the birth (and recording of that dependent in DEERS will not matter.

  • Ellie

    Maybe someone can help give more clarity to our situation. I showed this article to my husband this morning and he kind of mumbled something like it won’t affect us. He said it would cause problems with him commissioning? He’s currently using Tuitions Assistance to finish his degree. He’ll be done in about a year. Our daughter is 1, and I’m concerned that he won’t transfer it because he thinks it will mess up his commission. Help?

    • Jim Absher

      Shouldn’t have any effect on his commission, if he’s worried about it just have him transfer it after commissioning.

    • Dave

      Ellie, that is a good question and it sounds like you would need to nail down the requirements for him to commission. If he incurs the current requirement of an additional 4 years, will that impact his ability to get commissioned? The proposed law makes it so that 180 days after enactment, any transfer of benefits are subject to the new rules (10 years service plus 2 more years; children get 50% of BAH).

      • HarleyChic

        It requires 4 years of retainability… not retainability at the same rank. I’m sure if he is finishing his degree in a year, then intends to go through OTC, he intends to stay in well past the required 4 years.

        The option to transfer is open to any member of the armed forces active duty or Selected Reserve, officer or enlisted who is eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and meets the following criteria:

        Has at least six years of service in the armed forces (active duty and/or Selected Reserve) on the date of approval and agrees to serve four additional years in the armed forces from the date of election.
        Has at least 10 years of service in the armed forces (active duty and/or Selected Reserve) on the date of approval, is precluded by either standard policy (by Service Branch or DoD) or statute from committing to four additional years, and agrees to serve for the maximum amount of time allowed by such policy or statute.
        Is or becomes retirement-eligible and agrees to serve an additional four years of service on or after Aug. 1, 2012. A Servicemember is considered to be retirement-eligible if he or she has completed 20 years of active federal service or 20 qualifying years as computed (pursuant to section 12732 of title 10 U.S.C.).
        Transfer requests are submitted and approved while the member is in the armed forces.

  • A

    USAF ED Specialist, can you clarify this for me? I thought that service members could use the 9/11 GI Bill even if they used the Montgomery Bill years before. Recently we were told that the 9/11 GI does not give you additional months of tuition to the Montgomery GI Bill. You can use either one or the other. My husband used some of his Montgomery GI Bill for college over 20 years ago. He signed up for the 9/11 GI Bill when it first came out and transferred it to our child. We thought our child would get 36 months of tuition plus BAH, but now we are being told that whatever he used from the Montgomery Bill is subtracted from his 9/11 Bill. Now our child will only get 12 months 9/11 GI Bill instead of 36 months. This is also true for Gold Star spouses. I have a Gold Star friend who after her service time was up 14 years ago, used her Montomery GI Bill. Several years later, her husband was killed in combat. My friend and her kids each received the 9/11 GI Bill. When my friend went back to school and tried to use her 9/11 GI Bill she was told she used up the entire 36 months on her Montgomery GI Bill and would get nothing. Her kids were still able to use their 9/11 Bills though.

  • HarleyChic
  • Ali

    My husband is retired and qualified for VR&E but he won’t be going to college. Can he transfer that to our kid?

  • Ali

    My husband is retired and qualified for VR&E. He won’t be going to college. Can he transfer that to our kid?

  • Amy Copeland

    My husband served 4 years active duty and has been a reservist for the past 4 years. He does not mind agreeing to 4 more years. Our daughter is 3-so if he transfers his Post 911 GI Bill it to her now does he have to be a reservist or active duty when she uses it? He would be mid 50s when she goes to college and he does not want to stay a reservist that long? Or can he stay in 12 more years and then she can use it after he retires? Thanks for explaining.

    • Jeannette

      As long as he transfers it while he is still in the military, she can use it after he retires. I transferred my GI Bill to my daughter and she will end up graduating High School after I retire. Children can only use the benefit up until they reach age 26, though.

  • Lisa

    This is also posted in a response to another comment, but i am curious to how many were affected by this issue. I attempted to transfer my benefit with enough retainabilty a few years before i retired from the Air Force. I signed up on the website we were instructed at the time to use, i believe it was gibil.com (ish) (when this was still somewhat new) allocating 48% to each of my children and leaving 2% to me knowing i could move the percentages around. I clicked save, viewed it played around a little more went back in viewed it and left. A year later mil connect came out and became mandatory to sign in. When i signed in i went to ed benefits and it showed nothing as far as my gi bill allocations. I called AFPC about it and they told me that there were 4 systems not talking to eachother when i signed up. They asked if i recieved a letter in the mail and i said no, they said well if you didnt sign the letter and return it then it is not official. Like I was supposed to know this!!! So at that point i didnt reenroll because i didnt want the added year service commitment. So because of a faulty system i am now paying out of pocket for my son to attend a university, my retirement paycheck is going toward a benefit that was denied to me when i did what i was supposed to do. I am sure if they audited the tables in these databases they could see who signed up and i guarantee you my name is on there. Were do i sign up with other veterans that were done wrong and robbed of these benefits for there children. I served honorably for 20 years and did what i was instructed to do to transfer. This is BS!!! (my telephone call/trouble ticket to AFPC for this issue was also viewable on the AFPC mssging system but has since been archived since years have passed… There is proof i signed up somewhere in databases archived, but i still pay out of pocket.)

  • This may be a hard question to answer bc I myself do not feel like I can ask it clearly. Here It goes…. I entered the military from Illinois where I was born and raised. I was told that being from Illinois i had a 100% tuition coverage. I had gotten married when I was in the military and he got stationed in va. I had became a Virginia resident to get in state tuition Bc I did not move back to Illinois after the military. I assumed I lost my 100%coverage. I have attained a masters and utilized my GI bill and post 9-11 GI bill for this. But it was a 100% covered etc. I had to get student loans and pay them back w my GI Bill still going in debt with this way of doing things. Being a student and broke i used any money I coulD get to survive while working. My question is… Did I go about this the wrong way? Could I have had a 100% coverage BC I was still from Illinois but just living in va? ???
    If I have any money left over from my Post 9-11 Gi Bill can I give that to my daughter?

  • Maria Pavlidis

    Correction. It was not 100% covered. I still had to apply for a loan and then use my Gi Bill to pay the loan.

  • Tony

    When transferring months to two dependents, spouse and child, how many months do you give to each to max it out? I know it is 36 months total so do I have to split it up and do 18 to each or do you give them both 36. Is that possible?

  • If you have the eligibility to do this and don’t plan to use this benifit, my advice is to please transfer it before you leave active duty. I have an 18 year old headed to college and a 16 year old headed there soon. I am eligile for this Veteran’s benifit, but I can not transfer it to them because I retired prior to Sep 2009. I already have a Master’s Degree paid for by the Air Force years ago…of course, I could go back to college & get a PHD, another Masters or enter a technical training program. However, as a 20 year military veteran, it may be a better use of a taxpayer funded cost of a 4 year State University education for my children or spouse to get such an education that would result in their becomming better citizens and stewards of our nation’s future. I wonder how many Veterans who earned this benefit between Sept 2001 and Sep 2009 are in the same situation of NOT being eligible to transfer this to a spouse or child…maybe this legislation could also correct this original oversight.

  • Mig

    Does anyone here know if the service obligation can be done in the Reserves?? I will be eligible to transfer the benefits next June, so even if the new legislation passes, I would be covered under the 180 days. But I am not sure if I will remain on active duty. So, would I be able to make the transfer and serve the additional 4 years in the Reserves? Or maybe a combination or active duty and reserves? I haven’t been able to find any info on this.

  • nancy

    My husband retired in 2006 and has the post 911 bill. Can he transfer the benefits to me? If there was a window where he could have done it, we were not aware of it.