Poll: More Concealed and Open Carry Guns on Base?

Poll: Should we have more guns on base? http://wp.me/p1d7d0-92H

A reminder last week from big Air Force to base commanders that they are permitted to give more Airman the ability to carry weapons both openly and concealed on base has us freshly wondering whether or not the policy is a good idea.

On the one hand, the Air Force says that armed bystanders regularly stop active shooter incidents before police can intervene. On the other hand, FBI data examined by Military.com shows that may not be entirely the case – only 3.1 percent of incidents recorded between 2000 and 2013 were halted by an armed witness who was not law-enforcement.

There’s something to be said for feeling safer just because you know someone around you is armed and willing to help in a dangerous situation. And there’s also the argument that if the “bad guys” know someone might be armed, they could be less likely to be, well, bad. On the flip side, however, are plenty of worries including gun safety and making sure the good guys are actually good.

One thing is absolutely true – the issue is a complicated one. So weigh in. Do you think more troops on military bases should be armed?

Fill out my online form.

About the Author

Amy Bushatz
Amy is the editor in chief of Military.com’s spouse and family blog SpouseBuzz.com. A journalist by trade, Amy also covers spouse and family news for Military.com where she is the managing editor of spouse and family content. An Army wife and mother of two, Amy has been featured as a subject matter expert on CNN.com, NPR, Fox News, NBC, CBS, ABC and BBC as well as in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post. Follow her on twitter @amybushatz.
  • Michele

    What about the spouses that have concealed permits? Why will it only be airmen?

    • Marion Hatchell

      All citizens should have the choice of carrying. I feel that ALL persons that carry, concealed or open, should be both safety and scenairo trained. The exceptions to that are those military personnel that have had specific training with weapons, i.e., infantry, security, etc. The DD214 will list the training of the Military. Presence of mind has a lot to do with how one would react under certain types of stress pertaining a threat, perceived or otherwise. Learning a few laws and shooting at paper targets is not enough for me to feel secure around just anyone armed. I HAVE experienced some scary people with weapons.
      Signed USMC Retired and Vietnam Vet.

  • fb939

    Good idea, but vet carefully for PTSD and similar trauma, emotional stability, etc.

    • viet vet ’71-72

      yeah, sure! So, who decides if I’m fit to ‘again’ have access to a gun? Seems there was no problem ‘giving me a gun – M-16A1 plus many other models’ in Vietnam. There are millions of vets with PTSD, that doesn’t make them ‘crazy mass murderers’. Millions of them have ‘lived with PTSD’ for over 40 years, WITHOUT murdering anyone! We didn’t fight for the Vietnamese people’s right to FREEDOM, just so ‘politically correct’ rich people & politicians (in USA) could take away OUR rights!

    • Marion Hatchell

      PTSD is NOT a reason to deny carrying a weapon. I have PTSD due to my many tours in Vietnam. I have my act together enough to not be a harm to anyone because of it. Even with my experiences, I have attended concealed carry and sportsman courses. I recommend anyone with a weapon, carry or otherwise, be prepared through knowledge. Here is one place to learn about PTSD ……. .http://www.ptsdsupport.net/understanding_PTSD.html…..
      By the way, someone with no training scares the Hell out of me and I would not want to take my 9 yr. old Grandson to a movie knowing people are carrying with no training and knowledge.

    • Marion Hatchell

      PTSD is NOT a reason to deny carrying a weapon. I have PTSD due to my many tours in Vietnam. I have my act together enough to not be a harm to anyone because of it. Even with my experiences, I have attended concealed carry and sportsman courses. I recommend anyone with a weapon, carry or otherwise, be prepared through knowledge. Here is one place to learn about PTSD ……. .http://www.ptsdsupport.net/understanding_PTSD.html…..
      By the way, someone with no training scares the Hell out of me and I would not want to take my 9 yr. old Grandson to a movie knowing people are carrying with no training and knowledge.

  • Sherry

    I agree with Michelle and also the civilians need to be armed so they can defend themselves in case of an active shooter incident.

  • RLB

    I say if a person, civilian, military, vet, whomever, has been properly cleared and checked to carry a concealed weapon in public then that should extend onto military bases as well. Just because you’re on a secure base, that doesn’t mean bad things can’t or don’t happen. Perhaps bases could take it a step farther and require an additional, base/service/military specific, conceal carry license to those who already have permits to conceal carry in public.

  • MikeMc

    I generally agree that more open carry and concealed carry would increase general safety. However I am concerned with the general level of training in CCW courses that I have known about. Here in Ohio the number of hours required has been reduced from 12 to 8. This is not sufficient to prepare a civilian to properly react in a active shooting situation. Like several of the other posters above, I served for 4 years in the Marine Corps with two tours of duty in RVN. Finally, in my humble opinion anyone who served in combat will have some degree of PTSD. Twelve weeks of boot camp does not turn an 18 year old American into a cold blooded killer. The first time you pull the trigger it’s a shock!

    Semper Fi

  • Sheepdog

    AMEN! Finally common sense comes to the fore. Denying military the right to be armed on a military base is the most asinine politically correct maneuver conceivable. Then to argue whether or not an armed public dissuades terrorist activity is total bunk. Of course it will.
    Certainly, training is a must. Other than military training in the care and feeding of arms all non-military personnel should be required to pass a qualified hand gun safety course along with several hours of training. Ideally this would be included in the requirement for any CCW permit.

  • Otis beyong

    Brilliant idea…cheap alcohol at the class six, entitled alcoholic retirees that are faux news addicts hoping for a reason to blow someones head clean off….

    • D.M. (MSgt, ret)

      Not all retirees are alcoholics my friend. Considering your reasoning makes me think you may need attitude adjustment counselling. It is because of many retired folks that younger military members still have the rights they enjoy under our constitution. So, think again Otis and give thanks due to those of us who have served honorably to insure your safety.

  • GunnysWife

    I have no problem with firearm ownership and/or or concealed carry, whether on base or off…

    I DO have a problem with the level of training required for both.

    To own a firearm, a person needs zero training. Someone who has never before in their life touched a firearm, who has no idea how to load or unload it, who has never been taught one single thing about firearm safety, and who has no knowledge, whatsoever, of the laws regarding storage, transporting and use of a firearm, as long as they are not a felon, can purchase a firearm or five.

    To obtain a concealed carry permit, that same person just has to attend a few hours of instruction.

    The result is that there are people out in public, possibly seated just behind you or your children, in movie theaters, restaurants, etc., who have a lifetime total of 8 hours experience with firearms.

    Would you want drivers on the road that had only been driving a car for 8 hours of their life? Drivers who had never taken a written or practical test to show they understand the rules of the road, or how to operate a motor vehicle?

    I realize that many people decide for themselves to undergo much more training and practice, and are very knowledgeable about firearms, but it is NOT required. There are no rules or regulations that say a person must know *anything* about firearms to buy them.

    It is a fact that a great many people do not always make good choices in life (some drink too much, some drink and drive, some get into fights, some hit their wives, some abuse their dogs…), and adding a firearm into that mix, especially with the current lack of any type of competence requirements, will rarely end well.

    During the first 26 days of 2016, there have already been 21 children killed, and 26 injured by bullets.